Mixology Techniques: The Mixing Techniques

Mixology Techniques: The Mixing Techniques

You might be seasoned bartender looking into teaching a new student or a newbie bartender looking into learning mixing techniques then you need to take a look at the next four mixing techniques.

The Roll:

The Tools: Two shaker tins and a strainer (your choice)

Time: 15 to 60 seconds

The Process:

This mixing technique is used to make a Bloody Mary because of it the most effective way to chill and mix the cocktail without over diluting the tomato juice. It is also good for making drinks that use carbonated drinks to ensure that there is no build-up of pressure in the shaker. It also avoids making the drink flat by a stir.

You will fill one tin with ice a little bit more than half and also secure the ice with a strainer you prefer. With the other tin, build your cocktail then pour it in the other tin with ice. Transfer the mix not more Rocks than 4 times and transfer it to a servicing glass.

Rocks Shake:

Tools: A Cocktail Shaker

Time: 10 to 45 Seconds

This probably the most artistic mixing technique out here.  This is because you take into consideration several factors to determine the drink. These factors are the size of ice, how long you shake your mix and the intensity of your shake. You wouldn’t want an over-diluted drink but you also need to also need to remember the temperature of the drink will also affect the taste.

You will need to listen to how the ice behaves while in the shaker as you shake the drink. If you can hear the ice disintegrating and bursting up in shards, then there is a probability that you are over diluting your drink.

The Stir:

The Tools: A mixing gals, bar spoon, and a julep strainer

Time: 45 to 120 seconds

The Process:

Almost all cocktails made of rather very strong spirits such as the famous Manhattan or Bobby burns need to be stirred in a mixing glass. A stirred cocktail should have a rather smooth, almost if not velvety taste feel that just embraces the alcohol in it.

As a beginner, it can quite easy underestimate the technique of stirring complexity.  While the major concern might be effective dilution or even the chilling process, you will need to be quite careful with airing the drink too much with clumsy stirring.

You can consider using a Yarai mixing glass or a pint glass as well. Yarai is the diamond pattern cut into the glass. You will need to fill the glass with ice up to three quarters and leave room for the julep strainer as a dome as opposed to a bowl.

The position of the finger when stirring is not as important but the main goal is to keep the spoon in contact with the glass as possible and move it in a circular motion. In case you opt to move the spoon across the glass hits the ice rather roughly and this will bring in more air into the process.

Stirred cocktails are the easiest to make because you can taste the product to determine both the desired temperature and also level of dilution. If you stir for so long you might water down the cocktail or if you do not stir enough you might end up with a very strong cocktail.

Dry Shake/Whip:

Tools: Cocktail shaker and a mixer in- your choice

Time: 15-60 Seconds

The Process:

This technique is generally used to mix ingredients that have different textures and density such as cream or eggs. It is also used for drinks that are served on the rocks. Any process that requires you as the bartender to emulsify an egg will require more work because the process requires adding alcohol to the egg. This then requires you as the bartender to give it a strong shake before adding the ice for the final shake.

A simpler way to do the whip is to shake up a built cocktail. You can either add ice to the shaker and then do a rock shake. You can do a revere dry shake by doing a normal rock shake, strain the mix into a mixer tin, get rid of the ice then remix your drink until you get your desired level.